The Ellsworth Fire Department is made up of a combination of career members and paid-on-call members. EFD provides first response for fire and non-EMS rescue services for the city, covering 93 square miles.

  • Meet Us
  • Services
  • FAQs
  • Employment
  • Contact
  • Richard Tupper - Fire Chief

    Richard Tupper

    Fire Chief

    Fire - Deputy Fire Chief - Gary Saunders

    Gary Saunders

    Deputy Chief

    Daryl Clark

    Fire Lieutenant

    Tyler Kennedy - Firefighter

    Tyler Kennedy

    Firefighter/Engineer

    Fire - Firefighter - Peter Leighton

    Peter Leighton

    Firefighter/Engineer

    Jake Underhill - Firefighter

    Jake Underhill

    Firefighter/Engineer

    Ken Worden - Firefighter

    Ken Worden

    Training Coordinator

  • Burning Permits

    Commercial Exhaust Hood System Permits

    Fire Hazard Inspections

    Fire Alarm System Permits

    Sprinkler System Permits

  • How do I get a burning permit?

    Ellsworth residents may get a burning permit at the Ellsworth Fire Department any day from 7am-7 pm.

    Ellsworth residents may purchase an online burning permit through the State of Maine online burning permit system at State of Maine Online Burning Permit System

    The permittee must be the property owner or have written permission from the property owner, before obtaining the burning permit.

    The permittee should understand the restrictions stated on the burning permit.

    The permittee must have the valid burning permit in their possession while tending the fire and assure that no nuisance smoke is created.

    What are the guidelines for out-of-doors burning?

    When burning brush you should have at least 2 adults, hand tools such as shovel and rake, charged garden hose and/or buckets of water to control the fire. Brush piles should not exceed 10 cubic yards (Approximately 6ft x 6ft x 6) before starting the fire.

    When burning grass you should have at least 2 adults, brooms or other appropriate tools to suffocate a fire, charged garden hose and/or buckets of water to control the fire.

    When burning debris you should have at least 2 adults, hand tools such as shovel and rake, charged garden hose and/or buckets of water with to control the fire and the site should be inspected before the permit is issued.

    How do I know if my smoke detector works?

    Smoke detectors are also referred to as smoke alarms. They’re used in homes and businesses to warn occupants in the event of a fire. Detectors are designed first to detect smoke, and then give an audible warning to allow occupants enough time to get themselves out of the building. If a smoke detector is not working properly, injuries and even death can result.

    Here are a few quick tips to determine if your smoke detector is working properly.

    1. First locate your smoke detector. According to today’s standards, there should be a smoke detector in every bedroom and at least one detector on every level of your home, including the basement if you have one.
    2. Examine the smoke detector for a little round “test” button. All detectors have one. Press and hold the test button for a few seconds to see if it beeps. If it does, your detector is working properly. Current codes require all smoke detectors be interconnected, meaning that when one goes off, they all do. You should test your smoke detector once every month.
    3. If you push the round button and no audible alarm is indicated, remove the smoke detector and check your batteries. Batteries should be replaced twice a year. The best way to remember to do this is when you set your clock ahead, or back.
    4. Also, check the date on the smoke detector to determine the age. According to the manufacturer’s instructions, all smoke detectors should be replaced after 10 years of use. The date will be listed on the back of the detector. If there is no date on the smoke detector, it is over 10 years old and needs to be replaced.
    5. If you hear your smoke detector “chirping” (it continuously beeps every few seconds up to a minute). This is an indication that the battery needs to be replaced. Codes require that all smoke detectors installed today have electrical power to them in addition to a battery back-up.

    If you are replacing a detector, you can purchase them at most hardware/department stores.

  • The Ellsworth Fire Department is always looking for people who want to serve their community as on-paid firefighters. Stop by the fire department, any day from 8-5 to pick up an application. Applications are reviewed on a case by case basis.

    Applicants without firefighting experience must successfully complete the Hancock County Firefighters Academy which takes place every other weekend between January and May. In the Firefighters Academy you will learn basic fire fighting skills, how a fires behave, and how to extinguish a real fire.

    Becoming a firefighter is a commitment yet one that comes with great rewards. Knowing you have helped your neighbor in their time of need is a feeling many people do not get the chance to know. You also gain a second family you never knew you had. If you feel you have what it takes to join the crew, stop in and check us out.

  • Please use this form for only non-emergency questions. For emergencies, please dial 911.

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